My Sexy Saturday 27 A Soldier’s Italian Christmas: Sister Angelina meets her hero

Soldier_Italian_Christmas_snow

The Christmas Season is here with all the shopping and holiday parties but in days gone by, husbands, fathers, brothers, and sons were fighting in Europe.

What was it like for these men so far from home?

In “A Soldier’s Italian Christmas,” somewhere on the road to Rome, it’s December 1943 when Captain Mack O’Casey gets separated from his unit and makes a wrong turn…and meets a beautiful nun, Sister Angelina.

Before we get started with this week’s snippet, here we are at WEEK 27 on:

MY SEXY SATURDAY: Check out the sexy snippets from fabulous authors HERE!! 7 words, 7 sentences or 7 paragraphs.

Be sure to check out these fab authors and their sexy snippets HERE.

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“A Soldier’s Italian Christmas”

O’Casey Brothers in Arms 1

December 1943
Italy

He is a U.S Army captain, a battle-weary soldier who has lost his faith.
She is a nun, her life dedicated to God.
Together they are going to commit an act the civilized world will not tolerate.
They are about to fall in love.

In this snippet, Sister Angelina agrees to help the captain spy on the Nazis…

==============

I understand, Captain,” she said, grinning. “You have what I believe you Americans call a date.”

What devil in her had possessed her to say such a thing?

She acted like the village girls she’d seen flirting with the Nazi soldiers. Oh, the shame. But she’d been so overjoyed to see the Americans, she couldn’t help herself. Her hand shook so much when she heard the intruders, she’d grabbed Father Tom’s pistol, praying she didn’t have to use it. She’d just returned from restocking their food coffers from the monastery. After the Allies bombed the hillside, the monks had fled, taking what art they could with them and escaping down the steep terrain on mules. Father Tom had stayed behind with his faithful caretaker, Marcello, but the Nazi major commandeered the monastery library for his headquarters, making her mission not only difficult but dangerous.

She hated the Nazi with his harsh yells and whip lashings. Major von Arx wore his National Socialist medals with pride on his trim-fitting uniform. His long legs and short-cropped hair burned like a scarecrow’s made the children cry whenever he rode by the orphanage in his motorcycle sidecar.

That was not the case with the handsome American.

Angelina touched the medal with the cross around her neck and kissed it, giving thanks. She couldn’t believe her prayers had been answered, but did the Lord have to send such a gorgeous man? Bronze skin like an ancient warrior, broad shoulders, square jaw. The amused lift of his dark brow giving him the air of a romantic knight. But it was his eyes that held her in a trance. Clear blue pools swirling with curiosity, but also filled with purpose, always alert. No movement escaped him. Did he see how she looked at him?

Here was a good man, she thought, a strong man. A hero.

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A Soldier’s Italian Christmas is a holiday novella sweet romance available on Amazon Kindle

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Posted on November 30, 2013, in Amazon, blog hop, Christmas, heroine, Italian, Italy, Kindle, romance, soldier, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Love the descriptions and how you contrasted your hero with the villain.
    Dakota

    • Thanks, Dakota! WWII was such an intense time, but also an era filled with a romantic aura even in wartime. I wanted to contrast the good against the evil…and give the reader a yummy hero!

  2. Oh, sigh, I think I”m in love with Mack already. Really nice snippet.

    • Me, too, Linda. Mack was a firefighter before the war with the New York Fire Dept–he’s very protective toward Sister Angelina. It’s a sweet romance. The emotional level left me breathless at times the way these two fall for each other and the obstacles they face.

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